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Archive for March, 2013

Prepare to immerse yourself in the story of England at History Live! – an action-packed blockbuster and Europe’s biggest historical event.

History AliveOver 2,000 re-enactors and performers bring two millennia of history to life through stunning combat displays, thrilling battle re-enactments and a host of interactive experiences.

Gladiators, redcoats, and the Roman Imperial Army will be among the returning favourites at the event, which will also feature breathtaking displays of skill and valour from clashing knights on horseback in the Grand Medieval Joust and of bravery from Allied soldiers storming the beaches of Normandy.

New for this year will be a re-enactment of the Battle of Hastings, the battle that changed the course of the nation, as well as a demonstration of the impressive artillery used before gunpowder was even invented.

Away from the arena and parade ground, visitors can also step into living history encampments, discover fun activities and enjoy expert talks. With plenty to keep the whole family entertained, this is a weekend you will not want to miss.

 

Image courtesy of Point and Shoot Medieval Photography.

  • Date: Sat 20 & Sun 21 July 2013
  • Property:
    Kelmarsh Hall, Northamptonshire
  • Time: 9.30am-6.00pm
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  • Booking :
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  • Suitable for: Everyone

Purchase your tickets today by calling our dedicated Ticket Sales Team on 0870 333 1183 (Mon – Fri 8.30am – 5.30 Sat 9am – 5pm) or online below. Tickets will also be available to purchase at the event site on the day.

http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/daysout/events/history-live-kelmarsh-20-jul/

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Engineers digging the Crossrail tunnels have uncovered a plague pit believed to date from the Black Death in the 14th century. Here’s the BBC’s video of the site.

Photo courtesy of Crossrail.

Photo courtesy of Crossrail.

Over the past two weeks 13 skeletons have been discovered at a shaft in Charterhouse Square, just outside the boundaries of the  City of London, with more being unearthed every day. Experts believe they date from the Black Death, which killed tens of millions during the medieval period, wiping out up to 60% of the continent’s population.

A burial site was understood to be in the Farringdon area, but until now its precise location was uncertain. The Smithfield area is proving a fecund ground for archaeologists: in 2011 researchers were able to reconstruct the plague’s genetic code, using skeletons discovered in the 1980s.

This is the second major archaeological discovery in London of recent weeks, after the remains of a Roman settlement were uncovered in February. A pit of ‘lunatic’ skeletons was also discovered by Crossrail workers in 2011.

Source link: http://londonist.com/2013/03/14th-century-plague-pit-found-during-crossrail-dig.php

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Stonehenge & Avebury: the saving of Avebury

The Heritage Journal

Postcards to friends of the Stonehenge and Avebury World Heritage Site

King

In October 1871 the vicar of Avebury, Bryan King, demonstrated the value of local engagement by writing to Sir John Lubbock:

“When you were here – I think that you remarked that you would not object to purchase the two meadows in this village containing the stones & part of the Dyke. Since then the farm of which they formed part has been bought by a land & building society and one of the meadows in question – though not the one containing most stones – is now on sale. I have just seen the agent who informs me that they are all ready to sell it … Now this meadow with its proportion of Dyke contains about 6 acres … I do not know whether you would care to buy this or to make an offer for it…

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THE workforce that built Stonehenge 4,500 years ago came in their thousands from the length and breadth of Britain, a study shows.

Visit Stonehenge

Settlers are said to have travelled from as far away as the Scottish highlands

The massive stone circle was erected over a decade by people attending the equivalent of “Glastonbury festival and a motorway building scheme at the same time”, says Professor Mike Parker Pearson, from University College London.

Analysis of a nearby Wiltshire settlement suggests 4,000 people at once would have gathered at the site when Britain’s then population was only tens of thousands.

Cattle and pig teeth show people travelled from as far away as the Scottish Highlands.

Prof Parker Pearson said construction of the monument was “not all fun, there’s work too”.

Secrets of the Stonehenge Skeletons is on Channel 4 tomorrow at 8pm

Full story in the Express: http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/382949/Secret-behind-the-building-of-Stonehenge

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It feels as if we’ve always cherished the ruins of our stately homes, great abbeys, castles and ancient monuments. Yet our love affair with historic buildings is relatively recent. It’s been a revolution that flew in the face of industrial change and has been inspired both by acts of personal bravado and government intervention.

Main Image: BBC/English Heritage

Main Image: BBC/English Heritag

A new series on BBC Four this month called “Heritage! The Battle for Britain’s Past” looks at those pioneers of the past who fought to save the physical remains of the nation’s history. Some like William Morris, Octavia Hill and John Betjeman are familiar names, others – the “men from the ministry” /who worked quietly behind the scenes – are unsung heroes.

 
The first episode charts the birth of the heritage movement and the battle to save Britain’s great sites from destruction. The second episode looks at the interwar years, the rise of the day out to a historic site, and the struggle for the future of the English country house. And the final episode examines how in the second half of the 20th century, the definition of what did and did not constitute “heritage” changed.heritage-bbcfour

Made in partnership with English Heritage, the series features contributions from many of EH’s experts and draws upon its research into the early acts of heritage legislation – including the landmark Ancient Monuments Act of 1913.

A timely reminder to all of us about just how important these buildings remain, how we so nearly lost so many and the lessons we mustn’t forget.

Heritage! The Battle for Britain’s Past starts tomorrow at 21.00 on BBC Four
Links source: http://www.primeresi.com/heritage-the-battle-for-britains-past/12094/

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Within the Stonehenge World Heritage Site, the National Trust manages 827 hectares (2,100 acres) of downland surrounding the famous stone circle.

Walking across the grassland, visitors can discover other prehistoric monuments, including the Avenue and King Barrow Ridge with its Bronze Age burial mounds.

Bronze Age burial mounds rise among beech trees at King Barrow Ridge

Bronze Age burial mounds rise among beech trees at King Barrow Ridge

Nearby, Winterbourne Stoke Barrows is another fascinating example of a prehistoric cemetery. While Durrington Walls hides the remains of a Neolithic village.

The best approach to the famous stone circle is across Normanton Down, a round barrow cemetery dates from around 2600 to 1600BC.

stonehenge@nationaltrust.org.uk

http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/stonehenge-landscape/
http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/

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