Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for February, 2011

Tickets
Make sure you’re in the front row – sign up now for London 2012 ticketing news and information.

Tickets for the London 2012 Olympic Games will go on sale on 15 March 2011, for a six-week application window until 26 April 2011. Tickets for the Paralympic Games will go on sale on 9 September 2011.

A total of 8.8 million tickets will be available for the Olympic Games, with another two million for the Paralympic Games. Subject to availability, tickets will remain on sale until the start of every event.

We aim to give as many people as possible the chance to attend the Games, ensuring a great atmosphere for all the events. Each ticket will include free travel on public transport in London for the day of the event, to encourage spectators to use the transport system and take in the festivities throughout the city.

 There will also be free events, including Road Cycling, Triathlon and the Marathon. These events will take place on the streets of London, where spectators can line the route to cheer on the athletes. Big screens at Live Sites across the UK will also screen the sporting action.

Have you been offered unauthorised tickets?

Don’t be fooled by bogus websites and organisations claiming to sell tickets to the Games. Tickets will only be available via official London 2012 sales channels from 2011. You will not be asked to make a payment or sign a contract until then.
Total number of tickets

A total of 10.8 million tickets will be available for the Games – 8.8m for the Olympic Games and two million for the Paralympic Games

Links:
http://www.london2012.com/visiting/tickets/
http://www.london2012.com/
http://www.Bestvaluetours.co.uk
http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/olympic_games/london_2012/default.stm

If you are visiting London for the London 2012 Olympics then plan ahead.  Book tours and accomodation now or you will be dissapointed

British Tour Guide
Histouries UK – Private guided tours of London and Britain

Read Full Post »

Ancient Britons were not averse to using human skulls as drinking cups, skeletal remains unearthed in southwest England suggest.

The level of modification suggests the ancient Britons were "manufacturing" something of use

The braincases from three individuals were fashioned in such a meticulous way that their use as bowls to hold liquid seems the only reasonable explanation.

The 14,700-year-old objects were discovered in Gough’s Cave, Somerset.

Scientists from London’s Natural History Museum say the skull-cups were probably used in some kind of ritual.

“If you look around the world there are examples of skull-cups in more recent times – in Tibetan culture, in Fiji in Oceania, and in India,” said Dr Silvia Bello, a palaeontologist and lead author of a scientific paper on the subject in the journal PLoS One.

“So, skulls have been used as drinking bowls, and because of the similarity of the Gough’s Cave skulls to these other examples, we imagine that that’s what these ancient people were using them for also,” she told BBC News.

Gough’s Cave is situated in the Cheddar Gorge, a deep limestone canyon on the southern edge of the Mendip Hills.

Palaeo-investigations started there a hundred years ago, with many of the finds now held at the Natural History Museum (NHM).

The site is particularly noteworthy for the discovery in 1903 of “Cheddar Man”, the complete skeleton of a male individual dating to about 10,000 years ago.

But the users – and owners – of the skulls discussed in the PLoS One article are actually from an earlier period in the history of the British Isles.

This was during a brief warm spike in a series of ice ages that allowed humans living in southern Europe to venture north into what was otherwise an utterly inhospitable landscape.

These Cro-Magnons, as we now call them, were hunter-gatherers living on their wits and, it seems, eating human flesh when the need and opportunity arose.

Gough’s Cave famously held the remains of human bones that had been butchered to extract marrow in exactly the same way as animal bones on the site had been processed.

Our modern sensibilities find the thought of cannibalism repulsive, but these people lived in a different age, Dr Bello said:

“They were a one man band; they were going out, hunting, butchering and then eating their kill. And they were extremely skilled at what they did, but then that’s how they survived.

“I think the production of the skull-cups is ritualistic. If the purpose was simply to break the skulls to extract the brain to eat it, there are much easier ways to do that.

“If food was the objective, the skull would be highly fragmented. But here you can really see they tried to preserve most of the skull bone; the cut marks tell us they tried to clean the skull, taking off every piece of soft tissue so that they could then modify it very precisely. They were manufacturing something.”

NHM colleague Professor Chris Stringer helped excavate one of the skull-cups in 1987 and is a co-author on the paper.

“This research shows how extensive the processing of these human remains was,” he said.

“It’s impossible to know how the skull-cups were used back then, but in recent examples they may hold blood, wine or food during rituals.”

At about 14,700 years old, the Gough’s Cave skull-cups would represent the oldest, recognised examples in the world.

The museum plans to put a detailed model of one of the skull-cups on display this March so that visitors can get a deeper insight the practices of these ancient Britons.

Stonehenge Tour Guide
HisTOURies UK – Private tours of the West Country

Read Full Post »

Buy The Telegraph on Saturday and get a free copy of Trace Your Family History, The Essential Step-by-Step Guide which will show you how to discover your family background in only 14 days.

If you have ever put off researching your family history because you feel you do not have the time, then this guide will demonstrate just how much dramatic information you can uncover in a short period.

Free guide to tracing your family history

Free guide to tracing your family history

With so much material online, you will be astonished by what you can learn in a matter of hours once you know where to look. The forgotten facts about your family’s past that you will unearth will undoubtedly give you a taste for further inquiry.

With millions of records now online, the CD-Rom web directory, free inside The Sunday Telegraph, will point you towards the best and most relevant online resources.

The CD-Rom is a complete directory containing more than 1,400 sources to help you take your research further. By grouping websites into themes, the disc will prove invaluable in tracing your family’s past online. It is compatible with PC and Mac systems.

You will also find plenty of advice and inspiration at Who Do You Think You Are? LIVE at Olympia, London (25-27 February) where you can meet the Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine team.

Don’t miss The Telegraph on Saturday, February 19, and Sunday, February 20, for the FREE Trace Your Family History guide and CD-Rom which will give you the skills to discover your family’s past.

_____________________

We would like the thank the following websites for supporting this promotion.

www.traceyourancestors.co.uk/

Family history researcher offering three levels of service resulting in a bound book and scrolled family tree for all generations to treasure

http://www.debrettancestry.co.uk

Debrett Ancestry Research offers a highly professional service with a choice of fixed-budget programmes for anyone with UK ancestry. Free assessments and advice.

http://www.familytreeservice.co.uk

Family Tree Service research and create tailor-made family trees based on your own ancestry and genealogy. They are also dedicated to providing additional free content on census occupations, military history and geography.

www.familytreeuk.co.uk

The Family Tree UK has roots reaching back through 422 years of family history in the south and east of England

www.thegenealogist.co.uk

Start researching your family history with a 14-day free trial on the top rated site TheGenealogist.co.uk. With records back to 1100 to present day you never know where your research will take you.

British Tour Guide
HisTOURies UK – The Best Tours in Family History

Read Full Post »

Things that go bump in the night at Salisbury Guildhall
Strange noises heard at Salisbury’s Guildhall whilst restoration work is being carried out have encouraged stories that the building is haunted.

Salisbury Guildhall

Salisbury Guildhall

 

Those working at the centuries-old building in Market Walk in the city have reported unexplainable knocking and rattling sounds.

The building has long been rumoured to be haunted.

The Guildhall of today is the fourth such building to occupy this position within the City of Salisbury.

The first Guildhall dates back to Tudor times, when it was known as “The Bishop’s Guildhall”.

Then, the building was under the control of the Bishop, from where he exercised his feudal rights of criminal and civil justice.

Civil War

Salisbury was relatively isolated from the Civil War but there were a few occasions in which skirmishes took place. One such incident took place at the Guildhall in March 1655.

The Cavalier Colonel Penruddock’s rebels stormed the building and kidnapped the Assize judges and the High Sheriff of the county, and freed the inmates of the gaol.

This building is steeped in history and it has seen some things in its time and I imagine there’s one or two people still left in there who should have maybe left a while ago
Claire Burden, Salisbury City Council

It is said that the sounds of gunshots and screaming have been heard in the building ever since.

Salisbury City Council’s business manager, Claire Burden, who is overseeing the £1.3m renovation of the Guildhall said: “The building has a lovely friendly atmosphere but other people have come in in the past and said ‘oooh there’s something in here’ and now our builders have reported hearing rattling doors and creaking floorboards and all that sort of stuff in there.

“This building is steeped in history and it has seen some things in its time and I imagine there’s one or two people still left in there who should have maybe left a while ago.

“They’re all welcome to stay. It’s part of what keeps this building wonderful and what keeps people interested in it!”

http://news.bbc.co.uk/local/wiltshire

Salisbury Ghost Tours
SALISBURY CITY GUIDES is a grouping of individual professional tourist board qualified Blue Badge guides committed to tourism in Salisbury, England and to the surrounding area. We have an entertaining range of walks and tours of interest, both to the general visitor and the specialist, which we can tailor to specific requirements. We welcome enquiries from groups needing a special service to accommodate disability, to cater for a particular interest, or to enhance an existing itinerary.
They offer two tours of Salisbury:

THE CITY WALK . This 1½ hour guided tour will take you through the centre of the city to the Cathedral Close. Along the way your guide will tell you about the origins of the mediaeval city, its history and the reasons for its prosperity. They will draw your attention to buildings and monuments of architectural and historical interest, and link them to some of the City’s characters.

THE GHOST WALK. Let the guide introduce you to a cast of past inhabitants and the reason why they find it impossible to leave.
Click here: http://www.salisburycityguides.co.uk/

Stonehenge Tour Guide
HisTOURies UK – The Best Tours in History

Read Full Post »

  • The 15ft-high road ran from London to Exeter viaOld Sarum

    It was a route once trod by legionnaires as they marched across a conquered land.

    But, eventually, the Romans left Britain and the magnificent highway they created was reclaimed by nature and seemingly lost for ever.

    Now, some 2,000 years after it was built, it has been uncovered in the depths of a forest in Dorset.
    And, remarkably, it shows no sign of the potholes that blight our modern roads.

    Half-mile long: Laurence Degoul from the Forestry Commission stands on a 15ft-high section of Roman road uncovered in Puddletown Forest in Dorset

    Half-mile long: Laurence Degoul from the Forestry Commission stands on a 15ft-high section of Roman road uncovered in Puddletown Forest in Dorset

    Constructed by the Roman invaders as part of a route from London (Londinium) to Exeter (Isca), the 85ft wide earthwork stands more than 15ft high and consists of a sweeping road with deep ditches at the side.

    It was so densely covered by trees, however, that although its existence was known about, it simply could not be found until now.

    One of the country’s first roads, it was uncovered when the Forestry Commission, acting on advice from English Heritage expert Peter Addison, cleared the Norway spruce fir trees in Puddletown Forest.

    Mr Addison said it was the biggest Roman road he had come across and that it was probably designed to make a statement. It is thought that it might have been built shortly after the Roman conquest in the first century and its scale would have been chosen to intimidate people living nearby.

    The sight of a Roman legion marching along it would surely have had the desired effect.
    It is thought the road would have been made from layers of gravel and the fact it still exists is testimony to the skills of the builders.

    There is a central cobbled ‘street’, which would have been used for rapid troop movements, and outer ‘droving’ roads for livestock, as well as ditches for water drainage.

    Mr Addison said: ‘It’s extraordinary. It has been known about but when the Forestry Commission wanted to find it, they struggled.

    ‘The trees were planted so tightly it was difficult to move through them. But they called me in and I managed to find it.

    ‘It is part of the road that goes from Badbury Rings to the fort at Dorchester and was part of the network of roads from Old Sarum (now Salisbury) to Exeter.

    Artist's impression: The Roman road being built in the Dorset forest 1,900 years ago

    Artist's impression: The Roman road being built in the Dorset forest 1,900 years ago

  • It is absolutely huge and unlike anything I have ever seen. Here you have a large road with huge ditches either side. It is raised very high which is unusual. It is only speculation, but the height might have been to make a statement.

    ‘It is thought this was a road made early in the occupation and not used for long. If so, then it would have been incredibly impressive to the local people.

    ‘In other parts of the forest we know the road was made using gravel and they probably used layers to build up the agger (embankment). They built ditches on either side to act as soakaways to prolong the life of the road.

    ‘But more work needs to be done to find out these details.’

    It is hoped that archaeologists will be able to examine the road.

    A Forestry Commission spokesman said it would not be planting any more trees on it.

    The road will probably be grassed over in the future, he added.

    ‘We have painstakingly uncovered one of the UK’s most remarkable sections of ancient Roman road,’ the spokesman said.

    Wessex Tour Guide
    HisTOURies UK – The Best Tours in History

    Read Full Post »

    A chance to go ‘behind the scenes’ at the Roman Baths Museum.

    Roman Bath Tunnel Tours

    The tour includes

    ·        The main museum stone store with material dating from Roman to Victorian times from all parts of Bath and the surrounding area

    ·        The King’s Spring Borehole supplying water to the Pump Room and the new Thermae Bath Spa buildings

    ·        Georgian vaults under Bath Street and the water pipe that supplies the spa

    ·        Rooms of the Roman bath house not on public display, including the unusual circular laconicum

    ·        The chance to handle some of the items which have been excavated in Bath and are now stored in the various vaults.

    Although we do walk through most of the public areas of the site we do not stop in them and visitors are advised to visit them before or after the tunnel tour, during the normal public opening hours

    A chance to look ‘behind-the-scenes’ at the stores of the Roman Baths Museum. See and handle objects in the reserve collections and find out why and how they care for them. 
    Visit the vaults around the Roman Baths. See parts of the Roman Baths and temple not on public display and discover the hidden Georgian and Victorian history of the site. Numbers are strictly limited so advance booking is necessary on 01225 477779

    http://www.romanbaths.co.uk/

    The Roman Baths is one of the largest tourist attractions in South West England. Find out more about charges, opening times and the facilities that we offer at the Roman Baths in the links to the left. Please allow at least 2 hours to get the most from your visit.  Bath is often combined with a day trip to Stonehenge and the Cotswolds from London.  A private guided tour allows over 2 hours in Bath rather than the 45 minutes many coach operators allow.

    Stonehenge and Bath Tour Guide
    HisTOURies UK – The Best Tours in History

    Read Full Post »

    Neil Oliver tells the epic story of how Britain and its people came to be over thousands of years of ancient history – the beginnings of our world forged in ice, stone, and bronze.

    About the Programme

    A History Of Ancient Britain will turn the spotlight onto the very beginning of Britain’s story. From the last retreat of the glaciers 12,000 years ago, until the departure of the Roman Empire in the Fifth Century AD this epic series will reveal how and why these islands and nations of ours developed as they did and why we have become the people we are today. The first series transmits in early 2011 and there will be a following series in 2012.

    As well as being a presenter, Neil is also an archaeologist, historian and author. He began his television career in 2002 with the BBC2 series ‘Two Men in a Trench’. This battlefield archaeology series explored iconic British battle sites, focusing on human stories, tragedies and drama.

    Neil became a familiar face on television thanks to the hugely popular, award winning programme, ‘Coast’, in which the landscapes, history, geography and people of the British Isles are given centre stage in a continuing voyage of discovery, remembrance and reminiscence.

    Neil also presented ‘A History of Scotland’ on BBC 1 and BBC2. In this series he revealed how the story of his native Scotland is instrumental to the history of, not only Britain, but also Europe and much of the wider world.
    Neil Oliver takes us on an epic journey expoloring how Britain and its people came to be.
    Watch the trail here
    Neil Oliver’s official website

    Stonehenge and Ancient Britain Tour Guide
    HisTOURies UK – The Best Tours in History

    Read Full Post »

    %d bloggers like this: