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Archive for August 30th, 2013

A planning application has been submitted to the local authority in Wiltshire to build a modern burial mound.

Developer Tim Daw  wants to construct a new “long barrow” mound near All Cannings to give people another place to leave cremated remains.

The monument is planned for land near Cannings Cross Farm near Devizes

The monument is planned for land near Cannings Cross Farm near Devizes

The ancient tradition of burying the remains of the dead within earth mounds dates to the early Neolithic period.
Mr Daw said his plan is for “a modern interpretation” of a long barrow.

Wiltshire is home to a number of long barrows, including one at West Kennett a few miles from where Mr Daw is planning his monument on land near Cannings Cross Farm.

Mr Daw said the boat-shaped structure will be made partly from sarsen stone, and will span “about the length of three buses”.

The interior will be made up of seven chambers within which box-shaped niches will be formed on up to four shelves.

Winter solstice
Each niche will be separated from the next and sealed with a lockable door.

Depending on the size of the vessel containing the cremated remains, each niche will provide storage for between six and eight containers for a family group.

Mr Daw said the monument will also be built to align directly with the sunrise of the winter solstice.

He said: “The sun rise will come up through the hills and shine right down through the length of the long barrow to the end of the passage way.”

Wiltshire Council is expected to decide on the planning application in mid-October.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-wiltshire-23867760

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Where was the Stonehenge Festival?

Mike Pitts – Digging Deeper

 

All over the place really. On my first summer solstice visit in 1971 it was little more than a gaggle of people sleeping in the ditch around the stones. These two photos from Julian Richards’ excellent collection published by English Heritage show where it went from there: first immediately outside the earthwork to the south-west, so that it faced the rising sun on June 21; then across the road into what we call the Cursus field, National Trust land between Byway 12 and the Fargo Plantation. At its greatest extent it did run onto the Cursus itself (thanks for the comment, Francis Stoner), and spread eastwards into the Avenue field. Damage was reported at the time to the woodland at Fargo and to some of the barrows.

It’s high time a proper academic study was done of this story. There must be a great deal of information out there…

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