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Archive for the ‘London Olympics 2010’ Category

Tickets
Make sure you’re in the front row – sign up now for London 2012 ticketing news and information.

Tickets for the London 2012 Olympic Games will go on sale on 15 March 2011, for a six-week application window until 26 April 2011. Tickets for the Paralympic Games will go on sale on 9 September 2011.

A total of 8.8 million tickets will be available for the Olympic Games, with another two million for the Paralympic Games. Subject to availability, tickets will remain on sale until the start of every event.

We aim to give as many people as possible the chance to attend the Games, ensuring a great atmosphere for all the events. Each ticket will include free travel on public transport in London for the day of the event, to encourage spectators to use the transport system and take in the festivities throughout the city.

 There will also be free events, including Road Cycling, Triathlon and the Marathon. These events will take place on the streets of London, where spectators can line the route to cheer on the athletes. Big screens at Live Sites across the UK will also screen the sporting action.

Have you been offered unauthorised tickets?

Don’t be fooled by bogus websites and organisations claiming to sell tickets to the Games. Tickets will only be available via official London 2012 sales channels from 2011. You will not be asked to make a payment or sign a contract until then.
Total number of tickets

A total of 10.8 million tickets will be available for the Games – 8.8m for the Olympic Games and two million for the Paralympic Games

Links:
http://www.london2012.com/visiting/tickets/
http://www.london2012.com/
http://www.Bestvaluetours.co.uk
http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/olympic_games/london_2012/default.stm

If you are visiting London for the London 2012 Olympics then plan ahead.  Book tours and accomodation now or you will be dissapointed

British Tour Guide
Histouries UK – Private guided tours of London and Britain

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Key Facts

Sport: Sailing, Paralympic Sailing
Capacity: No seats at venue
New or existing? Existing, Permanent
Travel and Tours: See below

Location and regeneration

The venue is a combination of the Weymouth and Portland National Sailing Academy (WPNSA) and the adjoining commercial marina, in Dorset on England’s south coast.

It has kick-started the regeneration of the former Naval Air Station at Portland, now known as Osprey Quay, where new residential, commercial and marina facilities are already underway. It is an exposed spot at the western end of the English Channel, providing some of the best natural Sailing waters in the UK, with facilities on land to match.

About Weymouth Bay and Portland Harbour

Weymouth Bay and Portland Harbour provides some of the best natural sailing waters in the UK, with facilities on land to match.

The site has already hosted numerous international sailing events, including the 2006 ISAF World Youth Championships attended by over 60 nations.

Getting ready

Work to enhance the sailing facilities at Weymouth and Portland has been completed. The enhancements to the existing WPNSA facilities include a new permenant 250m slipway and new lifting and mooring facilities.

The project was completed on budget and ahead of schedule, providing world-class facilities for elite athletes and the local community more than three years before the Games.

During the Games

Sailing has historically been a non-ticketed event. We are currently reviewing our ticketing strategy with a view to bringing a spectator experience to suit various levels. This may include free ‘Live Sites’; quiet cliff observation points; ticketed venues with TV, tracking and commentary; and ticketed and specific spectator boats.

The ticketing review process is currently underway.

After the Games

The National Sailing Academy will benefit from the improved facilities that the Games will leave behind, providing a state-of-the-art facility for elite training, competition and local community use.

This use has already started: from a community programme through to hosting the Olympic Windsurfing discipline, RS:X class World Championship in 2009. This events programme is extensive and will also include hosting the IFDS (Paralympic Sailing) World Championship in 2011.

About Weymouth
Weymouth’s heritage as a seaport and fishing centre is overshadowed by its 18th century renaissance as a watering-place, and its more recent revival as a popular seaside resort. Most of the finest buildings are remnants of the town’s glory days as a Georgian resort, but there are even earlier houses to be found, including the converted Tudor cottages on Trinity Street.

George III lived in Weymouth, at Gloucester House (now a hotel). Reminders of the monarch are not hard to find; his likeness is cut into the turf of a hill outside the town, and a large statue stands on the busy seafront near the Tourist Information Centre.

 The seafront is the hub of activity in Weymouth, a stretch of golden sand bestrewn with deckchairs and crowded with sun seekers in summer. More relaxing perhaps are the opportunities for fishing and boating in the area. Within walking distance of the town centre are two nature reserves. Radipole Lake is home to birds who love open water, reedbeds and scrubby bushes, and Lodmore offers flood meadows, rough pasture and saltmarsh habitat.

 Weymouth is located between two Heritage Coasts (Purbeck and West Dorset Heritage Coast), and inland from the sea the entire surrounding region has been designated an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The town is just north-east of the Isle of Portland, a wonderfully isolated coastal area tenuously joined to the mainland by the narrow sweep of Chesil Beach. Portland is excellent bird-watching territory, with Pulpit Rock a good spot to observe puffins during the early summer. On the north-east coast of the Isle is Portland Castle, one of the best-preserved of Henry VIII’s coastal defenses.

Weymouth Beach
Weymouth Beach

Another, more modern defensive structure is Nothe Fort, built on a headland jutting into Portland Harbour in 1860. It was in service until 1956, and has since been transformed into a living museum, tracing the history of the fort, and in particular the role of Weymouth in the Second World War.

High speed ferries leave Weymouth harbour for the Channel Islands and St. Malo, in France.

Tours and Transport
Histouries UK are able to offer guided sightseeing tours of this stunning part of southern Britain including Dorset and Wiltshire.  We are able to offer tours from London to Weymouth visiting Stonehenge, Salisbury, Bath etc on route and vice-versa – ideal for famailies and small groups.  Maximise your time in Britain during the 2012 Olympics and book a tour (well in advance)

External links:
HisTOURies UK – Private guided tours
Coach Tours and Transport during the Olympics

London Tourist Information
http://www.london2012.com/games/venues/weymouth-and-portland.php
Visit Weymouth and Visit Portland
The Official Tourist Information Website for Weymouth and Portland

Dorset Tourist Guide
Histouries UK – The Best Tours of Dorset and Wilsthire

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Tickets to watch the 2012 Olympic Games will be among the most expensive in British sporting history, it’s been revealed.

Sports fans will pay as much as £2,012 for the best seats at the opening ceremony, while the same seats at the closing ceremony will cost £1,500.

The most expensive sport will be the athletics, to be held at the new 80,000-seat Olympic Stadium.

A coveted ticket to the men’s 100m final will cost as much as £725 – the equivalent of £76 a second based on Usain Bolt’s world record.

Beach volleyball, gymnastics, diving and swimming will also be among the most expensive finals to watch, at £450 for the best seats, with the basketball finals close behind at £425.
The prices – which exclude corporate tickets – easily exceed those charged for the finals of the FA Cup, Wimbledon tennis and Premier League football matches.

LONDON 2012 TICKETS – THE FACTS

WHAT CAN I WATCH?
There are 26 Olympic sports but 39 disciplines in total. There will be 302 medal events and 649 sessions of sport to watch.

HOW MANY TICKETS WILL BE SOLD?
A higher-than-expected 8.8million.

HOW MUCH WILL THEY COST?
The price will vary according to the event. Each event will have different ticket prices, ranging from £20 to £725.

Organisers say 90 per cent will cost £100 or less, two-thirds will be £50 or less and 30 per cent £20 or less.

There will also be 11 free ticket sessions for sports such as triathlon, the marathon, race walking, road cycling and sailing.

ARE THERE SPECIAL OFFERS?
Yes, for around 220 sessions and 1.3 million tickets.
Children 16 and under on July 27 2012 will pay their age.

Those 60 and older on the same date will play a flat £16.

This offer will not include tickets for any final but will cover every sport.

Wheelchair prices include a companion seat.

Children will also be able to go along thanks to a ticket share scheme. 50,000 tickets have gone to the London Mayor, 50,000 to the Government and 25,000 to sporting bodies.

The Mayor’s tickets will go to children in London, the Government’s to secondary schools around the UK.

WHEN DO TICKETS GO ON SALE?
March 2011.

WHERE DO I FIND OUT MORE?
Register online at http://www.tickets.london2012.com

However, games organiser Locog insisted taxpayers had not been priced out of the event they had funded and said 90 per cent of tickets would cost £100 or less.

A third of tickets will cost £20 or under, with Olympic chiefs unable to keep their promise that they would sell half of tickets at this price.

Some 1.3million tickets will be reserved at special prices for children and people over 60.

Under the ‘pay your age’ scheme, 10-year-olds will pay £10, 11-year-olds £11 and so on.

Those over 60 will pay a flat £16.

Event bosses face pressure to make £400million from ticket sales, while ensuring that the 26 sports remain affordable and that the stadiums are full – avoiding a repeat of the near-empty stadiums at some of the Commonwealth Games events in India this month.

London 2012 chairman Sebastian Coe described it as ‘the daddy of all ticket strategies’, adding: ‘We have three clear principles for our ticketing strategy: tickets need to be affordable and accessible to as many people as possible, tickets are an important revenue stream for us to fund the Games, and our ticketing plans have the clear aim of filling our venues to the rafters.’

Events such as the marathon, cycling road race and time trial and triathlon will be free because they are on public roads, although grandstands at the finish area will be ticketed.

The cheapest events include the shooting finals with a top price of £40, sailing at £55 and the modern pentathlon at £75.

There are 8.8million tickets available, with 6.6million of these available to the public from March 2011.

The rest will go to broadcasters, sponsors and the 204 overseas Olympic committees.

Some 1.7million people have registered on the london2012.com website, which will guide them in applying for tickets for the 26 sports, split into 649 sessions.

The Government wants each school in Britain to receive six free tickets, but London Mayor Boris Johnson is trying to find sponsorship for a further 75,000 to be given to London pupils so one in eight can attend the Games.

Lord Coe said: ‘We made a promise to inspire young people to choose sport and our ticket prices will get as many young people as possible to the Games.’

Olympics Minister Hugh Robertson added: ‘I am confident we will have packed stadiums and venues.’

Make your tour plans well in advance.  Escape the city for a day and join a private guided sightseeing tour.  Contact us in advance for any travel arrangements you may need. 

Tourist Guide
HisTOURies UK – The Best Tours of Britain

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Not since 1996, when England hosted the European Championships, has the country held a major sporting event. In 2012 that is set to change as London becomes the venue for the Olympic Games.

Having hosted the Summer Olympics twice previously – in 1908 and 1948 – the English capital certainly has history with the event, but even still there are surprises abound with improvements needed to stadiums, transport and accommodation.

With around seven million permanent residents, it’s hard to imagine how the city’s infrastructure will cope with the extra influx of athletes and sports fans that will be descending on the city from the end of July – traditionally a busy tourist season in any year.

The International Olympic Committee has been thinking about this since 2005 – when the games were awarded to London – so big changes are expected in the city. The world famous underground has seen changes, with an expansion made to the East London Line and upgrades have been made to the North London Line and the Docklands Light Railway as well.

On top of this a brand new rail service has been created – named in Olympic fashion as the Javelin – which features bullet trains that will speedily take passengers across the city.

There are expected to be around eight million tickets for the Olympics available, with half of them priced under £20 to ensure bustling crowds at all events. This means all visitors – from those in top range hotels to those in budget hotels in London – will be able to snap up tickets for at least part of the extravaganza.

Sensibly, accommodation for the Olympians will be spread across the city to ensure all competitors are housed close to where they need to be to compete, rather than in an all encompassing Olympic Village as per tradition, but a tradition that has become outdated as the games have grown and the events no longer all take place in one place.

The events will be taking place in a mixture of old venues that the city is known for – such as Wembley, Lord’s and the O2 Arena – as well as specially constructed arenas. As well as new sporting venues, the city will see other new buildings going up. The Shard, for example, is due to be finished in May 2012 and standing at 1017 feet it is sure to be a major sight on the London skyline.

Paul Buchanan writes for a digital marketing agency. This article has been commissioned by a client of said agency. This article is not designed to promote, but should be considered professional content.

Hotels in London Must Shape Up for 2012 Olympics

Not since 1996, when England hosted the European Championships, has the country held a major sporting event. In 2012 that is set to change as London becomes the venue for the Olympic Games.

Having hosted the Summer Olympics twice previously – in 1908 and 1948 – the English capital certainly has history with the event, but even still there are surprises abound with improvements needed to stadiums, transport and accommodation.

With around seven million permanent residents, it’s hard to imagine how the city’s infrastructure will cope with the extra influx of athletes and sports fans that will be descending on the city from the end of July – traditionally a busy tourist season in any year.

The International Olympic Committee has been thinking about this since 2005 – when the games were awarded to London – so big changes are expected in the city. The world famous underground has seen changes, with an expansion made to the East London Line and upgrades have been made to the North London Line and the Docklands Light Railway as well.

On top of this a brand new rail service has been created – named in Olympic fashion as the Javelin – which features bullet trains that will speedily take passengers across the city.

There are expected to be around eight million tickets for the Olympics available, with half of them priced under £20 to ensure bustling crowds at all events. This means all visitors – from those in top range hotels to those in budget hotels in London – will be able to snap up tickets for at least part of the extravaganza.

Sensibly, accommodation for the Olympians will be spread across the city to ensure all competitors are housed close to where they need to be to compete, rather than in an all encompassing Olympic Village as per tradition, but a tradition that has become outdated as the games have grown and the events no longer all take place in one place.

The events will be taking place in a mixture of old venues that the city is known for – such as Wembley, Lord’s and the O2 Arena – as well as specially constructed arenas. As well as new sporting venues, the city will see other new buildings going up. The Shard, for example, is due to be finished in May 2012 and standing at 1017 feet it is sure to be a major sight on the London skyline.

London is the most expensive place to stay in Europe, according to a recent survey, and that news has emerged at the same time as tourism minister Margaret Hodge has warned that hotels in the capital must shape up in order to be ready for the 2012 Olympics.

 The average cost of staying in a London hotel has leapt by a staggering 12% since April, and now averages £119 per night across the capital. Although not as expensive as New York or the world’s most expensive place for a one-night stay, Moscow, the rates are remarkably high considering that two-thirds of all London hotels are unrated. The figures show that even relatively meagre two-star accommodation in London averages £88 per night and guests have to typically stump up £109 to stay in three-star rated hotels.

 Tourism minister Hodge is worried that the combination of highly priced accommodation and the large percentage of non-rated hotels will damage the reputation of the city, and is keen for the hotel industry to get itself in order. She said: “If the tourist industry is to reap the potential £2.1 billion from the 2012 Olympic Games, then 85% of London’s hotels must be accredited before then.”

 Hodge is concerned that many people attending the 2012 Olympics will be coming to London for the first time and therefore wants their experience of the city to be a positive one. She added:

 “Hosting the 2012 Olympics is a huge opportunity for London and the UK tourism industry. In five years London will welcome millions of first-time visitors and we will want them to come back time and again – hopefully bringing their family and friends. It’s all about creating a lasting and positive legacy for the capital.”

But, the government doesn’t expect the capital’s hotels to do it all by themselves. A recently unveiled multi-agency strategy entitled: “Winning – A Tourism Strategy for 2012 and Beyond” has been drawn up by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport aided by Visit Britain, Visit London, and an assortment of Regional Development Agencies, aiming to give positive advice and limited financial assistance to the hotel industry throughout London and the UK.

Now that the gauntlet has been thrown down for hotels in London to make significant improvements, it is important that they respond positively if they are to fulfil the government’s aim of making the 2012 Olympic Games the start of a lasting legacy
If you are planning a trip to the UK in 2012 you may save some time and money visiting these web sites:
http://www.Welcome2London.org.uk
http://www.BestValueTours.co.uk
http://www.HisTOURies.co.uk
http://www.LondonTown.com

British Tourist Guide
HisTOURies UK – The Best Tours in British History

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London Olympics

The Worlds gone mad…………………..
The ‘quango’ VisitBritain has issued a guide book aimed at the British on how to treat overseas visitors during the Olympics.  Unbelievable ???
Please take the time to read some of the advice below, this is not one of my hoax blogs – its completely true!  The ironic thing is that VisitBritain is staffed with ‘non Brits’………………
If you happen to meet a Mexican during the 2012 Olympics, don’t mention the war – that is just one of the pieces of advice being given to Brits on how to treat foreign visitors during the Games.
The war in question is the 1845-6 war with the United States. Instead you should try talking about Mexican art or museums.
 They have been written by the agency’s staff, who are natives of the countries featured.

Britain is ranked 14th out of 50 when it comes to the welcome it gives to foreign visitors, but some wish they had received a more exuberant welcome from their hosts.

The comprehensive catalogue of cultural norms and traditions should ensure that you do not unwittingly offend any guests – or feel slighted because of a lack of understanding.

For example, the advice says that you should never call a Canadian an American.

Similarly, steer clear of physical contact when meeting someone from India for the first time.

Pouring wine for an Argentinean may seem to be an innocuous enough task, but it is in fact a cultural minefield – pouring it backwards represents hostility.

 When Japanese people smile they may not be happy, in fact they could be the complete opposite.

 Talking to them with your hands in your pockets will cause offence.

Remember Arabs are not used to being told what to do.

 

VisitBritain advice

 

 Sandie Dawe MBE, CEO of VisitBritain, said making visitors to Britain feel welcome was “absolutely vital” for the UK economy.

 She said: ”Overseas visitors spend more than £16bn a year in Britain, contributing massively to our economy and supporting jobs across the country.”

She added: “With hundreds of thousands of people thinking of coming to Britain in the run up to the Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2012, this new advice is just one of the ways that VisitBritain is helping the tourism industry care for their customers – wherever they come from.”

 Other pieces of advice include:

:: Winking is considered a rude gesture in Hong Kong.

 :: The Chinese are very suspicious – talking about poverty, failure or death could cause offence.

:: Visitors from the United Arab Emirates don’t take kindly to being bossed around.

:: When accepting thanks, Koreans will typically say “No, no.” The remark should be interpreted as “You are welcome”.

:: The term “Poms”, which is used by Australians and New Zealanders, is a term of endearment, rather than a insult.

:: Snapping your fingers in the presence of a Belgian is regarded as impolite.

:: Do not imply that Polish people drink too much.

 For those visiting London and the UK during the Olympics 2012 remember to book well in advance, we already have private tours booked for the summer of 2012. 

Personalised tours of  London and Britain
HisTOURies UK – The Best Tours during the London Olympics

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