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The four surviving original copies of Magna Carta will be brought together in 2015 for the first time in history, the British Library has announced.

Magna Carta
Magna Carta inspired the US Constitution and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

The event will take place over three days and launch a year of celebrations across the UK and the world to mark the document’s 800th anniversary.

 

The document is seen as the cornerstone of Britain’s constitution, outlining a set of basic rights.

There are four surviving copies of Magna Carta – two copies belong to the British Library, one copy is owned by Lincoln Cathedral and one by Salisbury Cathedral.

All three organisations will be involved in the event, which will be held at the British Library in London.

‘National significance’

The library said it would be a “once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for researchers and the public to see the documents side-by-side”.

The manuscripts will be examined by some of the world’s leading experts.

The library said the unification of the documents would allow them to be studied much more closely, particularly faded or obscured parts of the text.

Historians would also be able to look for new clues about the identity of the writers of the texts, which is still unknown.

The charter was issued by King John as a way solving the political crisis he faced when powerful barons rebelled against him and captured London.

Although almost all the clauses have been repealed in modern times, the document established a number of important principles that have been copied around the world.

These include the principle that no-one is above the law – including the king – the right to a fair trial, and limits on taxation without representation.

It inspired the US Constitution and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Claire Breay, lead curator of medieval and earlier manuscripts at the British Library, said: “Magna Carta is the most popular item in the library’s treasures gallery, and is venerated around the world as marking the starting point for government under the law.”

The Dean of Salisbury, the Very Reverend June Osborne, praised the values of social justice in Magna Carta and said she hoped the unification would increase awareness of the charter “to a huge new audience”.

The Very Reverend Philip Buckler, Dean of Lincoln, said bringing together all four copies would be of “national significance” and would mark a “pivotal point” in the anniversary year.

Lincoln Cathedral will be opening a new purpose-built Magna Carta centre in Lincoln Castle during the anniversary year

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-23304764

Join us on a tour of Salisbury and see the Magna Carta on Salisbury Cathedral

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Salisbury Cathedral is running an action-packed free open evening Night Visions: An Evening at Salisbury Cathedral on Friday 17 May from 6.30pm to 10.00pm.  The event is part of Culture 24s nationwide Museums at Night initiative, the annual festival of late night openings when hundreds of museums, galleries and heritage sites open their doors for special evening events.

Salisbury Cathedral ToursDavid Coulthard, Director of Marketing and Visitor Services, said “Last year’s Night Visions was an extraordinary success with more than a thousand visitors enjoying a fabulous evening in the Cathedral with music, stories, special tours and hands on activities.  This year we’re doing even more and look forward to having a cathedral full of people joining in the fun.  Starting at 6.30pm we’ve devised three and a half fast moving hours of different activities to entertain and appeal to families and our younger and older visitors alike.  There are four elements to the evening: music, stories, tours and hands-on activities. Come along, we might just surprise you!”

Musical activities include a ‘come and sing’ workshop, a short performance by Salisbury Cathedral Junior Choir, and organ demonstrations. Outside, you can enjoy stories in the lantern-lit cloister garden, follow the special mystery object treasure hunts in both the cathedral and cloisters, and especially for children there’s a picture quiz on the medieval frieze in the Chapter House and historical costumes to try on – even have your photo taken with King John!  There’s a quirky history ‘Things-you-never-knew’ trail of the Cathedral and exhibitions of embroidery and copes.  ‘Hands-on’ activities include decorating beautiful illuminated letters and patterned candle-holders, or creating a collage using stone rubbings with a touch of gold leaf.  Or there’s decorating biscuits, ‘Have-a-go’ stonemasonry and even some medieval games.

For the more energetic there are swift ‘roof tour tasters’ to see some of the Cathedral’s roof spaces and get a brief taste of what our full tower tours are like.

And while you’re in the Cathedral Close, visit Salisbury & South Wiltshire Museum for their Museums at Night event Music for All between 6.00pm  9.00pm. There’s live music from local music groups, meet historical figures behind Salisbury’s musical past, see the museum collections come to life, enjoy story-telling with Lizzie Bryant and gallery activities with artist Susie Gutteridge

Salisbury Cathedral link: http://www.salisburycathedral.org.uk

Wessex Tours
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2015 – The 800th Anniversary of the Magna Carta
The diversity of worldwide creativity to celebrate Magna Carta 800 is testament to it’s power and longevity. Thousands of events and activities are being organized for millions of people, all of whom have been touched by the events of 19th June, 2015. A Magna Carta Symphony will be performed, special exhibitions, lectures and conferences will be held. Magna Carta 800 is a global event to which the whole world is invited.

Magna CartaSalisbury Cathedral intends to re-display and re-present its Magna Carta in the newly-conserved Chapter House, safeguarding the document for the future and using the latest interpretation techniques to communicate Magna Carta’s historic background and modern significance to the many extra visitors it expects to welcome in 2015. It also hopes to conserve and repair the Cathedral’s medieval Cloisters where the Chapter House is located.

Brief background information on Magna Carta 1215
Magna Carta is one of the most celebrated documents in English history, regarded as the cornerstone of English liberty, law and democracy, and its legacy has been its enduring worldwide influence. It was written in Latin, the language of all official documents of the period, on a single skin of vellum (calfskin). It consists of 63 clauses written on 76 tightly packed lines, written with the standard medieval time and space-saving abbreviations. It is one of the most celebrated documents in English history whose importance cannot be exaggerated. It is often claimed to be the cornerstone of English liberty, law and democracy and its legacy has been its enduring and worldwide influence. The critical importance of the charter is that it imposed for the first time detailed written constraints on royal authority in the fields of taxation, feudal rights and justice, and limited unjust and arbitrary behaviour by the king. Magna Carta has become an icon for freedom and democracy throughout the world. The other surviving copies are held by the British Library and Lincoln Cathedral.

Stay updated. Preparations are underway for some truly memorable celebrations from a national bank holiday and a new bridge over the Thames to local street parties and tours

Salisbury Cathedral: http://www.salisburycathedral.org.uk/
Salisbury Museum: http://www.salisburymuseum.org.uk/
The events leading up to Magna Carta: http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/middle_ages/magna_01.shtml

Follow us on Twitter for updates leading up to the anniversary: https://twitter.com/HisT0URies

Wessex Guided Tours
Mystical Landscape, Magical Tours
http://www.HisTOURies.co.uk

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Cruising from Southampton? Flying home? Time to spare?
Why not explore some of England’s finest locations with your own personal guide. We can accommodate groups of all sizes, from individuals to large tour groups.

You choose the place, at your own pace, the itineraries are created especially for you……

Guided Tours From A Few Hours To A Day

Mini Coach Hire and ToursThere are so many wonderful places to visit within the catchment area of Southampton. Below are some of the more popular itineraries available to give you a taster of what is possible.

Our professional driver/guides are proud to showcase this region of England. You can choose from classic traditional sightseeing of places like Stonehenge, Salisbury or Winchester Cathedral, Georgian’ Bath, Glastonbury or perhaps pursue a theme where it be literary, English gardens or a pub crawl.

Our free tour planning service take great pleasure in assisting you to formulate an itinerary that fits your own individual requirements. We have a variety of guides with their own specialties and areas of interest and will assign one that is right for your tour profile.

Some Popular Itineraries From Southampton

Southampton & The Titanic

Come and discover Southampton’s Old Town, one of the gems of England. A place, with some unique features, that has played its part in history.

Go back in time at award winning museums, explore historic buildings; see how people lived here in past centuries and why the loss of the Titanic had such a devastating effect on Southampton.

Salisbury & Stonehenge Guided Tours

Just 30 minutes from Southampton is Salisbury. Famous for its Cathedral and Magna Carta this medieval city has much else besides. Stonehenge needs no introduction, you are so close to Stonehenge from Southampton its a shame if you don’t make a visit and experience the mysteries of the Stonehenge landscape.

Bath

Visit the beautiful Georgian City of Bath and take a panoramic tour of some of the finest architectural sights in Europe, including Bath Abbey, the Royal Crescent, the Circus, Assembly Rooms and the famous Pulteney Bridge. Explore the Roman Baths, built around thermal springs, which have been supplying water for over 2,000 years.

Portsmouth

Portsmouth Historic Dockyard allows you to discover these exquisite world renowned historic ships: HMS Victory and the Royal Navys most famous war ship and the worlds’ oldest commissioned ship. The Mary Rose – the only surviving 16th century warship on display anywhere in the world & HMS Warrior 1860 who made her triumphant return to Portsmouh in 1987 and now fully restored to her Victorian glory. These ships have shaped British history.

Countryside & Cottages, Cream Teas and Village Pubs

The New Forest is a former royal hunting area in the south of England. It was created in 1079 by William I (known as William the Conqueror) as a hunting area, principally of deer. It is a unique area of historical, ecological and agricultural significance, and retains many of the rural practices conceded by the Crown in historical times to local people

Picturesque Villages, bustling market towns and a special atmosphere and timelessness. Ponies and cattle roam freely around villages, following ancient forest tracks used for centuries by Commoners and their livestock. Picturesque thatched cottages tucked away in unexpected places, the New Forest has remained untouched by time, steeped in old customs and history, enabling visitors to unwind and enjoy its tranquil atmosphere.

Get To Understand Stonehenge Like Few Others From Southampton

The average tour bus spends at the very most one hour at Stonehenge. Time enough for those just curious to witness in person this world famous monument, get a few photographs, a better understanding of the mysteries of Stonehenge and perhaps a memento from the gift shop.

If you want something more than this, then this maybe is for you.

We have a team of local guides who specialise in Stonehenge and the Neolithic era. We can offer a detailed tour that explores all facets connected to Stonehenge, going well beyond what you hear on the audio tape.

Nothing is taboo, we cover in depth the archeological, planetary and mystical/pagan strands that intertwine in uncovering what Stonehenge is, and what it is all about.

Its not a dry lecture tour either, its very much a hands-on tour, we’ll track ley lines,enter inside Neolithic burial mounds and walk the ceremonial routes into the henges. You’ll also see some of the very best of the English Countryside and if you wish visit a village pub, away from the tourist crowds.

Links:
http://www.visit-southampton.co.uk/
http://www.southamptonairport.com/
http://www.londontoolkit.com

 HisTOURies UK – www.HisTOURies.co.uk
Mystical Landscape, Magical Tours

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A new film about King John further underlines history’s judgement of the medieval English monarch as a cruel tyrant. But among the dozens of bad kings and despots, why is John always the pantomime villain?

Paul Giamatti is the latest to play King John as a villain in Ironclad

Paul Giamatti is the latest to play King John as a villain in Ironclad

Surrendering lands in France, forced into a humiliating climbdown with the nobility and excommunicated by the Church. Not to mention being blamed for the murder of his nephew.

The medieval reign of King John has been characterised by disaster and his reputation languishes among the lowest for all the kings and queens of England.

This poor standing is illustrated by his persistently negative appearances in British cultural life 800 years on. Depictions on television, stage and big screen, particularly in Robin Hood films, usually present a man who is treacherous and weak.

In 1938’s The Adventures of Robin Hood, John (played by Claude Rains) is an overtaxing oppressor, while Disney’s Robin Hood showed John as a cowardly lion sucking his thumb.

A new film Ironclad, released in the UK on Friday, stars American actor Paul Giamatti as the villainous king laying siege to the noble barons in Rochester Castle, in the civil war that followed the signing of Magna Carta.

So why do we always like to bash King John?

Make no mistake, he was a bad king, says John Hudson, of the Institute of Medieval Studies at the University of St Andrews.

“He was a very considerable failure as a king. He loses a large amount of possessions inherited, in particular lands in France, like Normandy and Anjou. He manages to surrender his realm to the pope and ends up facing a huge baronial rebellion, a civil war and a war with France. In terms of failures, he is one of the worst kings.”

And his unpleasant personality compounds his mistakes, says Professor Hudson. Trying to seize control of the throne while his brother, King Richard I, was imprisoned abroad, lost him the trust of the people long before he became king himself.

“A lot of very effective medieval kings are cruel and inspire fear but he hasn’t inspired trust. For people to trust a king and fear him is essential but people don’t trust him.

“People wanted someone to be heroic and not to interfere with their lives. But John was a king who did interfere and wasn’t heroic.”

But it’s simplistic to portray John as simply evil and Richard good, like in some of the Robin Hood films, he says. At least The Lion in Winter, starring Katharine Hepburn and Peter O’Toole as John’s parents Eleanor and Henry II, portrays the family tensions acutely and gives a sense of the personal power struggles within the Plantagenet dynasty.

John grew up in a feuding family. He was born in Oxford in 1166, the youngest and favourite son of Henry II. When John was five, three of his brothers plotted against their father to seize the throne, enlisting the help of Louis VII of France and their own mother, Eleanor of Aquitaine.

The rebellion was short-lived but Henry II punished his wife by imprisoning her for 16 years. On Henry’s death in 1189, John’s brother Richard became king but he nominated his nephew, Arthur, as heir. John tried unsuccessfully to instigate a coup while his brother was in prison, captured on his way back from fighting the Crusades.

The popular image of John as a cruel tyrant began a few years after his death in 1216, after a turbulent 17 years on the throne. The chronicles of Roger Wendover, a historian and monk at St Albans, and his successor Matthew Paris, included many accounts of cruelty that have since been questioned.

‘John the punchbag’

The Tudors were more sympathetic to him, although Shakespeare’s The Life and Death of King John provides a mixed portrayal of the monarch as treacherous and ruthless, but also patriotic in standing up to Rome.

But it was the Victorians who made King John the pantomime villain he is today, says Paul Sturtevant, who is researching Hollywood depictions of the medieval period, at the University of Leeds.

“The Victorians used King John as a punchbag. Prior to the 18th and 19th Century, Robin Hood was not put in a historical place. It wasn’t about the monarch at all, just Robin Hood and his adventures.

“So the Robin Hood stories being placed in John’s reign is a recent thing. He’s portrayed as a pantomime villain because a number of accounts from the time suggest that people found him quite unpleasant as a person. So the question is to what degree those sources are accurate.”

The Victorians latched on to John’s moral failings like his cruelty and his sexual deviancy, taking mistresses married to barons, and this repulsed their newly-formed idea of medieval knights as perfect gentlemen.

“To the Victorian mindset, he was everything they didn’t want in an English king. They re-imagined the period in terms of courtly love and chivalry.”

Most historians would agree he was quite a bad king but whether he was a caricature of evil is another question entirely, he says.

King John at Runnymede John’s most famous moment is signing the Magna Carta

“Almost all the depictions of King John out there are Robin Hood ones and as a result he’s the villain, either bumbling and idiotic or in the Disney animation he’s a lion who sucks his thumb. He’s infantile, with a snake as a patsy.”

The truth is that he was an inept politician but he wasn’t a tyrant, says Mr Sturtevant. His conflicts were not with his subjects but with barons, the Pope or the French.

“I see him a bit like Barack Obama in so far as he inherited a nightmare situation from his predecessor but because he was a bad politician he didn’t help himself to get out of it.

“Richard still has a really good reputation as the heroic lion-hearted king but he spent only six months of his life in England and the rest either on crusade in Holy Land or at war in France.”

To pay for his foreign wars, not to mention a huge ransom when he was captured, Richard had raised taxes far higher than any level England had experienced. By the time John was crowned king, the cupboard was bare, but his fiscal demands led to unrest.

Mike Ibeji, who researched King John for Simon Schama’s History of Britain on the BBC, says it was in the interests of those who put John’s successor Henry III on the throne to portray him negatively. King John was very unlucky, he says, but he also made his own bad luck.

There are several times during John’s reign where he actually has the upper hand, where he’s in a position where if he just does things the right way, he’s going to end up succeeding in what he’s trying to do.

“But he always overplays his hand and goes too far because he’s in a position of power and can’t rein back. So he doesn’t have a sense of scale and that’s his biggest problem.”

For example, he quelled a rebellion in France but when his nephew and enemy Arthur then dies in his custody, the finger of suspicion points at John and the revulsion felt in France renews the revolt and leads to defeat. A kingdom that once stretched from the Scottish border to the Pyrenees was falling apart.

What John will always be remembered for, apart from antagonising Robin Hood, is signing Magna Carta, which limited royal power and restated English law. And some of his defenders say that at least he provoked the barons into introducing one of history’s most famous documents.

In the History of the English-Speaking Peoples, Winston Churchill wrote: “When the long tally is added, it will be seen that the British nation and the English-speaking world owe far more to the vices of John than to the labours of virtuous sovereigns; for it was through the union of many forces against him that the most famous milestone of our rights and freedom was in fact set up.”
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-12603356

Visit Salisbury Cathedral in Wiltshire on a private guided tour and view the original Magna Carta

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