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Posts Tagged ‘salisbury guided tours’

Be one of the few people to walk amongst the inner stone circle of Stonehenge at sunrise or sunset with our exclusive private customised guided tours.

Stonehenge sunrise Tours

Walk amongst the stones & experience the magical atmosphere within the inner circle

Explore Stonehenge away from the crowds, and hear insightful theories on the prehistoric monuments origins from your expert tour guide. Step into Stonehenge’s Inner Circle and admire up-close views of the monolithic blocks. It’s possible to combine your Stonehenge tour with a visit to Salisbury Cathedral, Lacock, Castle Combe, The Cotswolds, Avebury Stone Circle. West Kennet Long Barrow and Silbury Hill or even Glastonbury and King Arthur’s Avalon.

This is a rare opportunity to visit one of the most popular and mystifying Prehistoric sites in the world. Our bespoke Stonehenge special access tour is an early morning (sunrise) or evening (sunset) event, closed off to the general public where you will be able to walk amongst the stones and stand within the stone circle!

Our personalised guided tours of Stonehenge can depart from Bath, Salisbury or even London.  Perfect for individuals, families and small groups

Wessex Guided Tours
Stonehenge Guided Tours from Bath
Mystical Landscape, Magical Tours
www.HisTOURies.co.uk

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Mystical Glastonbury – Druids, Earth Goddesses, Myths and Legends, Ley Lines …

Glastonbury, like Tintagel in Cornwall, South Cadbury in Somerset and Caerleon in South Wales, is linked by tradition to King Arthur; Glastonbury Abbey is said to have been his final resting place. 

Our private guided tours allow you to climb Glastonbury Tor

Our private guided tours allow you to climb Glastonbury Tor (King Arthur’s Avalon)

The Historical Figure of Arthur

Very little reliable evidence survives from the fifth and sixth centuries when the historical Arthur lived. This period is known as the Dark Ages or Post-Roman period which followed the departure of the Romans from Britain. Some historians doubt whether Arthur really existed; others see him as a warrior king who led the Britons in their resistance against the Anglo-Saxon conquest of England.

Glastonbury is a centre for mystics, earth spirits and such like, a substantial part of what makes Glastonbury unique.

The Arthur of Medieval Literature

From the 12th century Arthur became the central figure of one of the great cycles of medieval European literature – the Arthurian romances. These have their origin in Geoffrey of Monmouth’s imaginative History of the Kings of Britain, completed in 1138. Geoffrey’s account provided many of the elements of the story, from Arthur’s conception at Tintagel to his last battle against Mordred at Camlann and final rest in Avalon, and featured his father Uther Pendragon, his wife Guinevere, his sword Excalibur and the wizard Merlin. Later writers added further characters and many variations on Geoffrey’s tale, depicting Arthur as a great warrior defending Britain from human and supernatural enemies, with related themes of the Holy Grail and the Knights of the Round Table.
Glastonbury Abbey link

Join us on a  Quest for King Arthur’s Avalon and the Holy Grail will weave myth and legends with the splendours of the English landscape.

  • We offer private guided tours departing from Bath , Salisbury or even London exploring the many Myths and Legends of King Arthur

    King Arthur’s Avalon
    Glastonbury TorChallice Well and the Holy Grail
    Stonehege Stone Circle
    Cadbury Castle and Camelot
    Tintagel Catle
    Glastonbury Abbey
    King Arthur’s Grave
    Winchester and the Round Table
    Challice Well and the Holy Grail
    Stonehege Stone Circle
    Cadbury Castle and Camelot
    Tintagel Catle

HisTOURies U.K
Wessex Guided Tours
The Best Tours in British History

 

 

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Stonehenge was constructed more than 4,600 years ago, but its mysterious aura continues to fascinate scientists and Druids alike. Now, new research finds that the story of this ancient site is far deeper than we thought — literally.

stonehenge

British researchers used high-tech archaeological sensing techniques to reveal hundreds of new features hidden beneath the dirt in lands surrounding Stonehenge, including 17 previously unknown circular monuments. Far from a solitary structure, Stonehenge appears to have been just one part of a much larger landscape of shrines. The results are being announced in a BBC feature to air tonight.

Going Deep Without Digging

The archaeological team used six different techniques to scan a 4.5-square-mile swath of land around Stonehenge, both by air and land, beginning in 2010. Magnetometers and ground-penetrating radar allowed researchers to compile three-dimensional information about structures hidden beneath the dirt. From the sky, laser scanning built precise topographic maps of the ground’s surface.

monument distribution

Seventeen smaller neolithic shrines were found scattered throughout the search area. Researchers’ data also revealed 60 huge stones and pillars that formed part of the previously identified “super henge” called Durrington Walls, Britain’s largest henge. Some of these stones were roughly 10 feet tall and likely stood upright like the iconic structure we all know. Durrington Walls is located roughly 2 miles northeast of Stonehenge.

They also found evidence of uses that predated Stonehenge itself. Prehistoric pits, burial mounds and a long “barrow” (a wooden building likely used for “defleshing” the dead in preparation for burial) were among the features discovered underground. You can learn more about their project and findings online.

Researchers believe the entire Stonehenge landscape developed over the past 11,000 years. They plan to continue poring over data to further understand the history and evolution of one of the world’s most intriguing sites.

Not-So-Ancient History

In addition to the stuff of ancient history, their investigation also revealed a few modern relics. Surveys produced detailed maps of practice trenches dug around Stonehenge by troops preparing for World War I, as well as the remnants of a military airbase used by the Royal Flying Corps.

Stonehenge, the 4,600-year-old gift that keeps on giving.

barrow

Top photo credit: Kiev.Victor/Shutterstock

By Carl Engelkin http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d-brief/2014/09/11/lasers-reveal-underground-secrets-of-stonehenge/#.VBRsb_ldXwg

Wessex Guided Tours
Explore Stonehenge and the ancient landscape with a local expert

http://www.HisTOURies.co.uk

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The finest medieval Cathedral in Britain and the tallest spire inSpire Britain – 404 feet

For over 750 years pilgrims have come to Salisbury to seek inspiration in the glory and peace of the building and surrounding Cathedral Close. Whether you come to worship, to marvel at or climb up to Britain’s tallest spire, to be awed by the beauty and scale of the cathedral interior or to study the original Magna Carta in our Chapter House, we welcome you. June Osborne, Dean

In addition to our regular tours we can often arrange ‘Cathedral tower tours’ for private groups.  Why not join a ‘Stonehenge Special Access’ and a Cathedral tower tour?

Tower Tours
Enjoy spectacular views as you explore the roof spaces and tower, climbing 332 steps in easy stages by narrow winding spiral staircases to reach the foot of the spire 225 feet above ground level. From here you can see up into the spire through the medieval scaffold, and from the outside you can look over the city and surrounding countryside.

Tower tours cost £8.50 for adults, £6.50 for children/seniors and £25 family (2 adults + 3 children) which includes a donation to the Cathedral. Scheduled tours run at least once a day for 11 months of the year (subject to daily conditions).
We also run tower tours for private groups, for more information, please contact –  email: trips@histouries.co.uk)

David – Salisbury and Stonehenge Tour Guide
HisTOURies UK – The Best Tours in History

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Stonehenge, the most famous of our English megalithic monuments, has excited the attention of the historian and the legend-lover since early times. According to some of the medieval historians it was erected by Aurelius Ambrosius to the memory of a number of British chiefs whom Hengist and his Saxons treacherously murdered in A.D. 462. Others add that Ambrosius himself was buried there. Giraldus Cambrensis, who wrote in the twelfth century, mingles these accounts with myth. He says, “There was in Ireland, in ancient times, a pile of stones worthy of admiration called the Giants’ Dance, because giants from the remotest part of Africa brought them to Ireland, and in the plains of Kildare, not far from the castle of Naas, miraculously set them up. These stones (according to the British history) Aurelius Ambrosius, King of the Britons, procured Merlin by supernatural means to bring from Ireland to Britain.”

This ancient enigma keeps everyone inquiring what truth lies in those huge stones and luckily you have come upon a site that will help you realize everything about Stonehenge.

You have wound upon an educational articles not as old as Stonehenge, but sure one of the oldest and very likely the first covering all faces of this mystical monolithic construction.

From the present ruined state of Stonehenge it is not possible to state with certainty what was the original arrangement, but it is probable that it was approximately as follows (see the following picture):


There was an outer circle of about thirty worked upright stones of square section (picture 2). On each pair of these rested a horizontal block, but only five now remain in position. These ‘lintels’ probably formed a continuous architrave (Pl. I). The diameter of this outer circle is about 97½ feet, inner measurement. The stones used are sarsens or blocks of sandstone, such as are to be found lying about in many parts of the district round Stonehenge.

Picture 2. Plan of Stonehenge in 1901. (After Archæologia.) The dotted stones are of porphyritic diabase.

Well within this circle stood the five huge trilithons (a-e), arranged in the form of a horseshoe with its open side to the north-east. Each trilithon, as the name implies, consists of three stones, two of which are uprights, the third being laid horizontally across the top. The height of the trilithons varies from 16 to 21½ feet, the lowest being the two that stand at the open end of the horseshoe, and the highest that which is at the apex. Here again all the stones are sarsens and all are carefully worked. On the top end of each upright of the trilithons is an accurately cut tenon which dovetails into two mortices cut one at each end of the lower surface of the horizontal block. Each upright of the outer circle had a double tenon, and the lintels, besides being morticed to take these tenons, were also dovetailed each into its two neighbours.

Within the horseshoe and close up to it stand the famous blue-stones, now twelve in number, but originally perhaps more. These stones are not so high as the trilithons, the tallest reaching only 7½ feet. They are nearly all of porphyritic diabase. It has often been asserted that these blue-stones must have been brought to Stonehenge from a distance, as they do not occur anywhere in the district. Some have suggested that they came from Wales or Cornwall, or even by sea from Ireland. Now, the recent excavations have shown that the blue-stones were brought to Stonehenge in a rough state, and that all the trimming was done on the spot where they were erected. It seems unlikely that if they had been brought from a distance the rough trimming should not have been done on the spot where they were found, in order to decrease their weight for transport. It is therefore possible that the stones were erratic blocks found near Stonehenge.

Within the horseshoe, and near its apex, lies the famous “Altar Stone” (A), a block measuring about 16 feet by 4. Between the horseshoe and the outer circle another circle of diabase stones is sometimes said to have existed, but very little of it now remains.

The whole building is surrounded by a rampart of earth several feet high, forming a circle about 300 feet in diameter. An avenue still 1200 feet in length, bordered by two walls of earth, leads up to the rampart from the north-east. On the axis of this avenue and nearly at its extremity stands the upright stone known as the Friar’s Heel.

In 1901, in the course of repairing the central trilithon, careful excavations were carried out over a small area at Stonehenge. More than a hundred stone implements were found, of which the majority were flint axes, probably used for dressing the softer of the sandstone blocks, and also for excavating the chalk into which the uprights were set. About thirty hammer-stones suitable for holding in the hand were found. These were doubtless used for dressing the surface of the blocks. Most remarkable of all were the ‘mauls,’ large boulders weighing from 36 to 64 pounds, used for smashing blocks and also for removing large chips from the surfaces. Several antlers of deer were found, one of which had been worn down by use as a pickaxe.

Note:

More Overmuch nine hundred stone rings subsist in the British Isles. Of these, Stonehenge is the most best known.

The megalithic monuments of Britain and Europe pre-history those of the oriental Mediterranean, Egyptian, Mycenaean and Greek civilization.

The Druids had nothing to do with the building of the stone rings. Druids are known to have taken their ritual activities generally in sacred forest woodlet.

Nicholas – Stonehenge and Salisbury Tour Guide
HisTOURies UK – The Best Tours in History

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